‘Cecil Beaton’s Diaries’ (Greenside at Nicolson Square – Lime Studio, until AUG 27th)

“As we romp through the highlights and lowlights of a lively and eventful career, there is much Wodehousian whimsy and theatrical high camp to raise many a smile.”

Editorial Rating: 4 Stars (Nae Bad )

Society and celebrity photographer Sir Cecil Beaton (1904-1980) was something of a legend in his own lifetime. Also an award-winning designer in the world of fashion, theatre, and film, he was a lifelong diarist, and his journals read like a Who’s Who of the great and the good of the 20th century. His picture portraits of queens and commoners flattered his subjects, but after his death, the pen-pictures revealed in his unexpurgated diaries most certainly did not. These documents are very entertainingly adapted for the stage and performed in this one-man show by Richard Stirling (Bridgerton, The Crown, Jeeves and Wooster).

1930s Rolleiflex camera in hand, the Panama-hatted, linen-suited Stirling looks every inch the suave Beaton, his note-perfect dialogue engagingly capturing the aristocratic hauteur with which his subject viewed the world. As we romp through the highlights and lowlights of a lively and eventful career, there is much Wodehousian whimsy and theatrical high camp to raise many a smile. But in stark counterpoint, the less genial side of Beaton’s character often pokes through. His private thoughts about even royal clients could be mercilessly cruel: one laugh-out-loud moment came when Princess Margaret was referred to as looking like “a wealthy seaside landlady”. No punches are pulled here when it is also revealed that at one point in the 1930s, Beaton was suspected of holding – in common with many of his class at that time – anti-semitic views. He strenuously denied this, but for some time as a result he was blacklisted by several Hollywood studios. It is perhaps revealing that when Beaton himself became the subject of a portrait in oils by the artist Francis Bacon, he loathed the nightmarish Dorian Gray-like vision that Bacon created.

Whilst Beaton may not remain a household name these days, this mid-day show nonetheless attracted a quite sizeable and receptive audience who shared the roomy black-box auditorium with me. Stirling’s fine performance is well supported by a generous selection of Beaton’s most famous images, which are back-projected onto a large screen at the back of the sparsely-furnished set. But perhaps a little more in the way of scenery and a few smart decorative touches might visually improve this show about a man to whom style and appearances were everything? Nonetheless, the sustained applause at the end confirmed my impression of a worthwhile and entertaining piece of theatre.

So come for the photos. Stay for the pithy dialogue. Leave with a smile on your face. Get your smartest coats on and go see this.

 


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‘Sex Tips for Straight Women from a Gay Man’ (Gilded Balloon Patter Hoose, until AUG 28th)

“The flamboyant style and innuendo-laden patter had the audience shrieking with laughter from the outset. “

Editorial Rating: 5 Stars (Outstanding)

The programme note “Includes scenes of a sexual nature” is putting it mildly for this hilariously raucous and bawdy romp. Based on a book of the same name by Dan Anderson and Maggie Berman, it comes to the Edinburgh Fringe after productions in Las Vegas and Off-Broadway New York. Not for the shy or straight-laced, the tips of the title are presented as a step-by-step guide to sex in the format of a scholarly presentation that quickly escalates into something like Love Island-style reality TV or an X-rated late-night quiz show.

At the centre of the action is Dan, the “Gay man” of the show’s title, played by Adam Fane, who hosts the evening like Graham Norton on acid and is camper than a field full of tents. His flamboyant style and innuendo-laden patter had the audience shrieking with laughter from the outset. His foil is Robyn, a bookish ingenue who vainly tries to sustain the pretence of an academic seminar amidst an onslaught of dick jokes and phallic symbols. While we’re on the subject of the penis, come prepared to volunteer a nickname for the male pudendum to be used for the rest of the show. I heard the audience propose everything from the workaday “knob” to the exotically suggestive “beef whistle”, but the one we ended up with was “Ever-Ready”. The third cast member is Bradley Allen Meyer, who plays Stefan the stage manager. Something of a stud who clearly excites the interest of Robyn. Stefan is used as a life model and stripper for some of the tips demonstrated.

Things were cranked up another notch when a little more audience participation saw three brave ladies take the stage to mime various arousal techniques under Dan’s instruction. This greatly excited the other women in the audience including my wife – normally a presbyterian sort of lady – who started fondling me in a way she hasn’t for a wee while. Dan whipped things up even further to whooping hysteria when we were invited to mime something – modesty forbids me from saying what – using our rolled-up programmes. At this stage my wife giggled: “This is like a Hen night in Blackpool!” (And she told me she was going to a conference…)

This ribald laugh-out-loud show is an absolute hoot. The large auditorium was nearly full when I was there and I can only imagine things getting even busier as word gets around. So come for the Sex Tips, stay for the laughs, and leave with a few nifty ideas to buck up your love life. Get your sexiest coats on and go see this!

 


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‘Bird with Kylie Vincent’ (Gilded Balloon Patter Hoose, until AUG 28th)

“This is edgy and very funny stuff, delivered with self-deprecating wit that invites much laughter”

Editorial Rating: 4 Stars (Nae Bad)

There is no shortage of stand-up comedy at the Fringe these days, which is rather taking over from theatre. This production (and I think that’s the right word for it) comes somewhere between the two. Kylie Vincent takes the stage as a feisty in-your-face young comedian, opening with some funny if fairly conventional observation about being an American in Edinburgh.

But we quickly realise there’s going to be more to this act than meets the eye. The traditional relationship trope of performer and audience is exploded by her analysis of a heckle she received at a gig in New York – to which we listen on audiotape – before this leads her off into a revealing and confessional exploration of her self-image and personal life. The usual idea of a comic making wry observations about the world we all share is abandoned as we are drawn into the sometimes dysfunctional and abusive world of her “white trash” family upbringing. This is edgy and very funny stuff, delivered with self-deprecating wit that invites much laughter – but I noticed there were several highly introspective episodes when there was scarcely a giggle for some minutes as the audience were raptly absorbed in listening to stories that were a little too painful for amusement. Jerry Sadowitz this ain’t – and I mean that as a compliment.

The eponymous “Bird” is Kylie’s name for herself. She sees herself and others as metaphorical animals, with other friends and family referred to by names such as “the deer” or “the gazelle”. Tellingly, all of the males in her life are monkeys or apes, with her father being “the gorilla”. Although a fine emotional rollercoaster of a show, I felt that overall it fell a little too far down between the two stools of dramatic monologue and stand-up comedy to be an out-and-out success in its current form. But Kylie Vincent is someone to watch: this combination of misery memoir and wryly observational humour felt like a work in progress that has much potential and I suspect we’ll be hearing more from Ms Vincent in years to come.

So come for the laughs, stay for the heartbreak, and leave thinking a little more about the ups and downs of your own family life. Get your coats on and go see this emerging new genre of tragicomedy.

 


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‘Horse Country’ (Assembly George Square Studios, until AUG 29)

“A dazzling series of verbal loops, covering fishing, trained seals and sea lions, the usefulness of horses and children (once both are broken in) and ‘freedom’.”

Editorial Rating: 5 Stars (Outstanding)

There’s a long and honourable tradition of shows with two protagonists (usually male) trapped together in an unusual situation. ‘The Dumb Waiter’, ‘The Zoo Story’, ‘Steptoe and Son’, most of Laurel and Hardy, ‘Waiting for Godot’ and Rick and Ade in ‘Bottom’ to name a few. To that list, we can now add Horse Country, CJ Hopkins’s just over 60-minute play, first seen at Edinburgh in 2002.

This time it’s Flying Bridge Theatre Company, based in Newport, to bring Sam and Bob to life. And in the form of Daniel Llewelyn-Williams and Michael Edwards, they are in very safe hands. As the audience enters, both actors are onstage, slippers on, seemingly channelling their inner Laurel and Hardy (also playing as the front of House music), in particular Edward’s nervous grinning and waving to members of the crowd embodying the spirit of Mr Laurel.

However, the cosiness does not last long as the play begins in a blizzard of words, images and ideas which shake us out of any complacency. Sam and Bob, our protagonists, take us through a dazzling series of verbal loops, covering fishing, trained seals and sea lions, the usefulness of horses and children (once both are broken in) and ‘freedom’. And here’s the nub, for all Sam and Bob’s talk and dreams of freedom, they are essentially trapped in a system they cannot control and from which they seemingly cannot escape. The search for the lost nine of diamonds from their deck of cards is as futile as their quest to go “out there”, we get an occasional glimpse and then it disappears.

I was reminded at times of watching Twin Peaks, accept everything you see and hear, then work out your own meaning later.

Both actors show superb verbal and physical dexterity throughout the performance and their onstage chemistry is perfectly aligned. They invite us into their world and we willingly take the trip, which makes the one moment of real violence all the more shocking.

It’s a strong performance for Flying Bridge Theatre and hopefully will have a life beyond Edinburgh.

Come for the slapstick. Stay for the verbal gymnastics. Leave with a free carrot (maybe). Get your riding coats on and go see this.

 


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‘Chris McGlade: Forgiveness’ (Frankenstein’s, until AUG 24th)

“He is serious, powerful talent.”

Editorial Rating: 5 Stars (Outstanding)

Would you laugh at jokes about a pensioner being murdered?

Even when the pensioner in question is the comedian’s father?

I did. And you would.

In the basement of Frankenstein’s pub, we met Chris McGlade, the Smoggie James Nesbitt. From the off he was prowling the audience, slapping us on the back, getting in our faces, and joking about us all with a glint in the eye.

McGlade told us at the start it was a long show (2 hours) and we were to get comfy: go to the toilet, get a pint, come and go… you just aren’t allowed to leave’.

The first hour of the show has been called elsewhere a cri de cœur against the metropolitan liberal elite. It is in part.

It is more than that though and to view it as such misunderstands the show. The first hour is McGlade not only telling us about who his dad was but also explaining the culture that he, and his father, grew up in. A culture that shaped them. A culture that was rough but kind. A culture where you mocked others but with a smile.. and with the expectation you would be mocked back. The culture he feels his now ignored, belittled or denied. A culture that has roared both here and in the USA.

This show is an English ”Hillbilly Elegy”. To see it is to understand why so many Northern working-class voters voted Tory in 2019 and voted for Brexit a few years earlier.

There were a few folk younger in the crowd and whilst there are moments of genuine shock in that first hour the moment they bristled was when he announced he’d voted Tory. That interested me – some of the language and themes will likely offend some people but it was a working-class man who announced he’d voted Tory that brought silence. The use of racial language, the on the edge jokes… they got laughs.

Did I agree with everything McGlade said about working-class culture? No. There was plenty to challenge but I think he’d welcome that with a joke, a wink, and craic. There was plenty of truth there and plenty to think about. There were moments that made me think deeply and moments that made me laugh out loud. There were moments throughout where I swore out loud in shock only to find myself laughing.

This is a comedian who has been brought up in the tough world of working men’s clubs. There is much disdain of this. I’d guess many comedians on the circuit couldn’t shine there and at Edinburgh. McGlade does. He is a serious, powerful talent. He notes he is an outlier – a 50-something, white, working class, heavily accented guy who hasn’t been to University. It is a long way from the all too frequent liberal university grad tell a bunch of liberal university grad jokes that make them feel smug.

His skit of walking around the audience telling the sorts of jokes he’d tell there – all the expense of audience members – was very good. Whilst I am sure he shines in those venues he shone here because of his fleetness of foot – there are times when you think a joke is going one way and he totally wrongfoots you. His gag about middle-class people peppering their speech with French only to do so himself was very clever. Gags about heroin addiction and being a good Catholic were laugh-out-loud.

The first half is integral to the second. He wants you to understand his dad, and the world they lived in, and the second half focuses more on the relationship with his father, his family, and his now estranged wife and how those relationships (and their endings) have shaped him.

The second half just wouldn’t work without the first. There are jokes aplenty still but it is more thoughtful, more poignant, more beautiful. He tells us of his anger, his rage, his tears. He tells us of the jokes he told to the Police when they explained his father had been murdered. He tells us of the moments in court where people fell about laughing. He makes the audience laugh when he tells us of a bizarre suicide attempt where he is saved by a mobster’s daughter. His point throughout is what unites working class people is that they find humour everywhere.

There are moments of beauty here. I enjoyed his occasional diversions into poetry. His joking with the crowd was phenomenal (at one point it looked like he was going to do a Sadowitz by unbuttoning his trousers but stopped and laughed it off). The political message in the first half will make many uncomfortable but it will make more laugh.

Ultimately though it all builds to forgiveness. Here is a man who has forgiven the man who brutally murdered his father. A man who understands how the relationship with his father has shaped him. His language at points is astonishingly un-PC. If he can speak so eloquently about forgiving a man who strangled his father perhaps the Edinburgh Fringe crowd can forgive him that?

Come for the insight. Stay for the laugh-out-loud moments. Get your heavily accented coats on and go see this.

 


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EdFringe Talk: Bird With Kylie Vincent

“I think a new Kylie will come out of this and will make me a stronger person and performer with the learning curve of balance.”

WHO: Kylie Vincent

WHAT: “How does a queer, GenZ comedian survive her past, the pandemic, and the indignities of a stand-up career? Vincent (aka Bird) takes the audience on a (seriously) funny flight, often through taboo comedy territory. Audiences say Vincent is a ‘badass, punk rock, hilarious’ storyteller and Bird is ‘…emotional, dark, and funny! Go see Bird!'”

WHERE: Gilded Balloon Patter Hoose – Coorie (Venue 24) 

WHEN: 19:40 (60 min)

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Is this your first time to Edinburgh?

Yes, this is my first time at the Fringe! It is so special because I have never cried this much in my life. Just kidding, but not really. It’s amazing that I get to consistently do my solo show everyday, on top of doing stand-up sets on other people’s showcase. To see great art everyday and be surrounded by that is definitely special and some people don’t even get to experience in a lifetime. It’s hard to be a person here since you’re constantly working, I think a new Kylie will come out of this and will make me a stronger person and performer with the learning curve of balance.

What are the big things you’ve learned since 2019 and have you absorbed any of the lessons yet?

In my show, I talk about my childhood sexual abuse and in 2019 I had not told anyone about it. In 2020, I started working on my show and it became a huge part of my identity. I think I’ve learned particular strength in identifying and feeling supported a part of an art and survivor community and that there often is freedom in letting that go and putting it into your art. I’ve also learned that I am addicted to chickpeas. I’ve lived off of them, like there’s a shortage or something. The other night, I fell asleep with a can of chickpeas and a fork in it next to my pillow and I woke up and rolled over and was shocked. I said to the chickpeas, “did we…?”

Tell us about your show.

I wrote my solo show! Barbara Pitts McAdams is directing & producing, and we also have David Calvitto on, co-producing. I met Barb about 4 years ago when I was advocating for gun control at a rally when I worked for the organization March For Our Lives (a non-profit gun violence prevention group). Barb is with Tectonic Theatre Project which creates activist devised work, like The Laramie Project, and at the time was working on a play about gun control activists. She interviewed me, we hit it off, and I started working on projects with her. She became sort of a mentor to me and when I was working on my show Bird, I sent her an early draft for feedback and she took interest in the piece and said she would like to produce and direct it. She also brought David on to help us with the Fringe run, as he’s been to like 17 Fringe’s total or something like that? I don’t know he’s old and it’s a high number.

What should your audience see at the festivals after they’ve seen your show?

Sam Morrison’s show “Sugar Daddy” such a hilarious, beautiful solo show. Sam is also a NYC comedian and is very well respected in the comedy community, but was blown away when I saw his show out here…his ability to make you laugh until you cry and then you actually cry, is so special and I highly recommend it.

Lucy Hopkin’s “Dark Mother” is an experience and I would do no justice explaining it if I tried. Such a fearless, talented, spiritual artist.


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EdFringe Talk: Fritz and Matlock

“I’ve missed the madness the past few years.”

WHO: Jessica Millward: Director

WHAT: “In a Sheffield basement, two men try to bury the bodies of their past to find a hopeful future. With no way out, will Fritz make it to his wedding? Will Matlock get away with murder? Or will the police finally raid the marijuana grow in the attic? A new dark comedy with a fresh take on men’s mental health, the care system and addiction. 2021 Offie nominees for Lead Performances and Most Promising New Playwrights. ‘Reminiscent of the works of Beckett and Pinter’ ***** (TheReviewsHub.com). **** (Stage).”

WHERE: Pleasance Courtyard – The Attic (Venue 33) 

WHEN: 14:05 (60 min)

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Is this your first time to Edinburgh?

I came to the Fringe in as a punter in 2019 (and even as an actor in 2018) but this is my first time bringing a show to Edinburgh as a director. I’ve missed the madness the past few years. The festival is an amazing place to see new work that breaks the mould so it’s even more exciting to be here with a bold new writing show ‘Fritz & Matlock’. It feels like a hub of new talent. I can’t wait to connect with other artists and inspire my own practice.

What are the big things you’ve learned since 2019 and have you absorbed any of the lessons yet?

We are just making theatre. It isn’t life or death, even though it can feel like it. (Ask me at the end of fringe if I’ve taken this fully on board or not!)

In terms of my work one big thing I’ve learnt is to take more risks. I wasn’t that interested in theatre with surreal undertones in 2019 but now I love it!

Find people who share your theatre values, tastes and who you can be really honest about the work with. I’ve found people the past couple of years who I have this with and I want to find more.

Work with people who are nice and you want to get a pint with. I’ve absorbed this and will be taking full advantage at the fringe.

Tell us about your show.

I met Jamie and Sal, who wrote and perform the play, when I was assistant director on Operation Crucible at Sheffield Theatres. I was instantly drawn to their work ethic and talent. After talking to them and reading Fritz & Matlock (a new play they had written together over lockdown) I knew I wanted to be the one to direct it. The show is produced by Part of the Main and we are a Pleasance Associate company after doing Fritz & Matlock at Pleasance London in October 2021. After that run we were nominated for Offies for writing and performances, and got a lovely 4 stars from the Stage which we are really proud of. It’s got legs for a post-Fringe run so we’re looking forward to chatting with regional venues as the Fringe progresses.

What should your audience see at the festivals after they’ve seen your show?

We are a neurodiverse led team on Fritz & Matlock so we’d love to shout out ‘Joshua and Me’, directed by the brilliant Lucy Jane Atkinson. It’s one-woman show about being a sibling to someone who’s autistic – 10.55am at Pleasance Dome. We can’t wait to catch it!

Part of the Main have two other shows on at Edinburgh Fringe as well. In ‘Bloody Mary: Live!’ Mary Tudor does stand up with a feminist twist at 10pm Pleasance EICC. ‘All by Myself’ is a show with no words about being your best self when no one will watch. That’s at ZOO playground at 6.25pm. All powerhouse female directors.


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EdFringe Talk: Vidura Bandara Rajapaksa: Monsoon Season

image of event

“I hope to tour the show after the fringe but we’ll see.”

WHO: Vidura Bandara Rajapaksa

WHAT: “In 1999, Vidura’s family left war-ridden Sri Lanka in search of a better life. Now in 2022 he’s performing an hour of comedy in a Scottish nightclub. Vidura Bandara Rajapaksa’s highly anticipated debut hour is the story of how he got here, covering all of life’s major talking points: race, religion and Ratatouille. As seen on ITV2’s The Stand Up Sketch Show. Best New Comedian Berlin finalist.”

WHERE: Monkey Barrel Comedy (The Hive) – Hive 2 (Venue 313) 

WHEN: 13:55 (60 min)

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Is this your first time to Edinburgh?

I’ve visited the festival in the past, but this is my first time as a performer. I am really excited to be a part of it debuting my show, rather than watching from the outside like times I’ve visited previously.

What are the big things you’ve learned since 2019 and have you absorbed any of the lessons yet?

That I can survive more than a few nights without getting on stage, a situation that was somewhat forced on me considering the events that followed 2019.

Tell us about your show.

The show itself is written, directed, and performed by myself, and produced by Country Mile Productions. We connected after they saw me perform live at a competition. I hope to tour the show after the fringe but we’ll see.

What should your audience see at the festivals after they’ve seen your show?

They should try and see anything theatre or music. I would highly recommend Britney or Shelf over at the Pleasance. They’re both amazing sketch/musical duos. As someone that’s around stand-up most of the time it is wonderful seeing other forms comedy can take while I’m up here.


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‘Jack Docherty: Nothing But’ (Gilded Balloon at the Museum, until AUG 26)

“Docherty leads us effortlessly through the story, with some nicely observed characters and an impressive bit of lip-syncing, plus a few Scottish references (a cheer for mention of The Blue Nile!).”

Editorial Rating: 5 Stars (Outstanding)

Jack Docherty has always been a class act. From his early double act with Moray Hunter, through the years of Absolutely, through now to the self-aggrandising Chief Cameron Miekelson in Scot Squad, Docherty has been an engaging and fascinating performer.

I’m glad to say this trend continues with ‘Nothing But’, a time-shifting story of love, anticipation and disappointment, spread over 40 plus years but chiefly focused on a brief affair between two people at the Edinburgh Fringe in the late 80s that is rekindled many years later and how that relationship came to destroy a marriage and affect the subsequent relationship with his daughter. Docherty has an easy charm and is a natural storyteller, starting with his lifelong disappointment in the ‘clown’ at a friend’s fifth birthday party and running through his life. Although presented as a true story, how much of it actually happened is left to the audience to decide.

With a couple of poster-covered blocks and a few projections, Docherty leads us effortlessly through the story, with some nicely observed characters and an impressive bit of lip-syncing, plus a few Scottish references (a cheer for mention of The Blue Nile!). At no point does the story feel forced or staged although, at one point he notes,  the situation gets to a point of such clichéd romance where even Richard Curtis would say “hang on a minute…”

Having ‘retired’ from live performance for a few years, it’s very good to see such a wonderful performer back in front of an audience. There are only a couple of performances left, so don’t miss out, because as the man himself says “it’s the Edinburgh Fringe, and all bets are off.”

Come for a top professional at the top of his professional powers. Stay for the story well told. Leave knowing you got to see the unicorn before it vanished from the glade. Get your coats on (quickly) and go see this!


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EdFringe Talk: Paul Williams: In the Moonlight

“The huge challenge of Edfringe is probably a big part of what makes it such an amazing and satisfying experience overall.”

WHO: Paul Williams

WHAT: “Join New Zealand’s fastest comedian (5km and 10km) for an enchanting afternoon In the Moonlight. The show includes music, romance and even photos. He’s been on TV, starring in the critically reviewed Taskmaster New Zealand. Good for all ages but if you’re really old, please only come if you promise to stay calm. ‘How much of Paul Williams’ endearing clumsiness is planned, and how much is accidental, is difficult to ascertain’ (Chortle.co.uk). ‘Insanely talented’ (Rose Matafeo). **** (Skinny). **** (List).”

WHERE: Assembly Roxy – Downstairs (Venue 139) 

WHEN: 16:30 (60 min)

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Is this your first time to Edinburgh?

This is my 4th time in Edinburgh and it’s one of my favourite places. The chicken kebab from Kebab Mahal is one of my top 5 dishes in the world.

What are the big things you’ve learned since 2019 and have you absorbed any of the lessons yet?

I’ve learned almost nothing since I was 13. I guess I recently learned that in the saying ‘a rolling stone gathers no moss’, moss is good. My whole life I’ve been constantly staying on the move, trying to avoid getting moss on me.

Tell us about your show.

I wrote my show and it’s produced by a company called Berk’s Nest. After Edinburgh I’m planning on retiring and living out my days in the Swiss Alps.

What should your audience see at the festivals after they’ve seen your show?

Christopher Bliss, Anna Man, Sheeps, Celya AB, Zach Zucker, Patti Harrison. I could go all day. Every year I make sure to see every show at the fringe and I’ve never seen one that I didn’t love.


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